Enraptured by Raptors in Westchester…


 

Among the presentations at the festival was “Close Encounters With Birds of Prey,” a kind of Raptors 101 given by Bill Streeter of the Delaware Valley Raptor Center.

Among the presentations at the festival was “Close Encounters With Birds of Prey,” a kind of Raptors 101 given by Bill Streeter of the Delaware Valley Raptor Center.

 

Dear Feeling Friends,

In this February 12th, 2009 New York Times article,  reporter Kate Stone Lombardi covers the “Eagle Fest, an event that has been held annually for the last five years to celebrate the return of the bald eagle to the lower Hudson Valley.” How exciting is her mention of the people of all ages, tripods and cameras at the ready to view the blooming population of Bald Eagles, the American National Bird, in Westchester. Many of the bird pairs are transplants from Alaska, some of whom do migrate to and fro each year.

Though I did not attend…(had I only known, thinks she wistfully), it seems like it was a great event given our recent Canada Geese / Jetliner conflict in Manhattan. It seems to me encouraging that there are people in our great State who appreciate different avian species for their inherent value as living beings who share our urban and semi-urban spaces.

I chose the above photograph because of the resemblance between Misters Streeter (human) and Barney (avian). Every life form has a counterpart that cares for its continued survival, something akin to what humans call Love and Concern, so to see an inter-species resemblance at an event in which there is an abiding concern for the survival of these Eagles and other Raptors seemed a fitting focal point for reminding ourselves that humans don’t have existential priority, we just have (sometimes destructive, sometimes ameliorative) technology. There is a difference. This event was a shining example of ameliorative technology for/ knowledge about breeding eagles in captivity, releasing them to the wild and ongoing population maintenance and surveillance.

To be clear, while I generally frown upon “species management” and surveillance of any kind, to see it used for the benefit of Others is heartening and heartwarming.

Link to the NYT article: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/02/15/nyregion/westchester/15eagleswe.html

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